Gen X at 40

Canada's Favorite Blog

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Humblebub -

Hell, Wayne is welcome at HB's anytime. Oh goody..a dirty fight. Sounds like fune. (Rymes with ruen)..<spell checker off>

Alan -

It is not a matter of welcome. It is about one's own space. A room with a view. A comfy old armchair in the corner for Wayne. If he swears too much, smokes a bad cigar or needs a bath I'll give him a kick from time to time.

Dan James -

Being the bootaire in this case it was purely for the sake of my readership and nothing against either Wayne or Alan. The conversation in question looked more like an email exchange between Wayne and Alan and not a blog type conversation. Wayne, Alan, enjoy taking each other on here at GenX at 40 and please feel free to still contribute to CEOBlues in your 90% usual manner ;-)

Wayne -

I am humbled and truly touched by this outpouring of affection and human kindness...

The thread did go astray...it was my fault, not Alans...I mentioned golf first.

Can all this wait until I put the clubs away?(Mystery Man from Moncton...? Sounds like a bad comic book title)

Alan -

But most of all Dan is right - a blog is a man's castle. I should have said more than "Bye" upon reflection. Mea cupla, too.

There. All kissiemakieuppie.

So now we have a wee corner of the world for that type of conversation tangents upon tangents of rude or intercontinental hashing - they all matter but the best place is the before the right audience. Feel free Wayne - and Dan and Craig and whoever. By placing it in the "Recommended" area, rather than the front page, it is a bit of a smokey back room but it is one which never floats away off the page.

Brad Pineau -

Hey Alan, I think I saw Wayne talking about your momma on another blog...

Humblebub -

Yep, the back room is a good idea. Enter if you wish or stay away..readers choice.

Alan -

I was thinking about this - one long rambling thread about anything - add links to anything [within the arbitrary and unwritten code] and rant rant rant. It won't clog up the front page but it also will avoid Dan's quite proper observation on thread busting. I have noticed [not only myself but others creating] the conclusive post which sometimes more stymies debate rather than ties it up with a neat knot. I may even see if I can remove this from recent posts but kep the number of posts cliking down lower at recommended so you will know what somone is spouting.

And spelling doesn't matter...

And my mother can take care of herself...

Alan -

<p>My rant for the morning. Dontcha hate it when corporations take advantage of an event like the blackout. We are all on gouger alert here in eastern Ontario and gas prices are not up. Far away in Nova Scotia with its own refineries and segrgated market, prices spike and PR drone yap.

Wayne -

Remember...banter is good for ratings. Clubs may be put away early this year. Damn.

Alan -

Got an ouchie?

Wayne -

Blog Golf. Severe case of the "lefts" out of nowhere. Interesting development at Belvedere....their green problems are due to poor drainage on greens just built in '97. The present poor greenskeeper was to be hung from birch tree on 14 fairway by members when scientist discovered the problem...root rot resulting from poor drainage due to "unsuitable top-dressing material applied 4 years ago" during previous greenskeepers reign. I would not want the job of greenskeeper...600+bosses...all experts.

Wayne -

Letter to the Editor (whom might not like this)Wayne is from PEI.

Alan -

You may be from PEI but you are on planet Moncton.

Wayne -

<a href="http://ap.tbo.com/ap/breaking/MGA44DE5LJD.html" target="blank">Interesting development in the use of spy-cams in good police work...</a>Have they read your disertation?

Alan -

They took my warnings to heart - finally. By the way, don't take a ciggie or a paper cup of water from the cops if they ever ask you questions. That is how they get the DNA. There is a big difference between the investigative data banks and the evidence they rely upon in Court. Only the latter is subject to the Charter.

Wayne -

<i>Dr. Phil</i>?Go Figure. I come home from a hard day at the golf course?one that is showing signs of significant improvement, I might add?and she is sitting in front of the TV, enthralled with the show <i>Dr. Phil</i>, who has just finished making a point that I have claimed as my view for years, but one she has always refuted. Now that Phil has accredited it, it is now correct. To her credit, she has now acknowledged where she first heard it, the fact she was not convinced, but has now changed her view – all seemingly to me because she saw it on TV.

Now being a somewhat solid, confident bloke?except on the first tee?this has had no significant impact on my self esteem. But has me wondering about the power to influence others, and the different approaches to manipulation, positive or negative?and whether I should want to work on my own persuasive abilities and strategies.

It is interesting to observe who or what has an influence on people. It says a lot about character, past experience and salesmanship, an art lost in these times of the depreciating value in customer service, and corporate boardroom study of target clients.

Note to the editor: I would really like to see on your home page my intro changed from "Mystery Man" to something like "Proof that today, anyone can get published" It might improve my chances to get on Peters Blogroll.

Alan -

[I cannot be moved. You are what you are. You are also at my place.]

TV is a freaky thing. At 40 I have lived from the time that Trudeau could fill a Mall parking lot with people wanting to see him in the 1973 election tour to today when the Rukster can find it amazing that he sees Pat Mella...essentially a CFO of a small city...in person. I say burn the TV transmitters and tear down the cable wires. I have never been so happy as in the latest blackout - seeing the stars in the City and clean AM radio reception on the transistor.

Wayne -

My first attempt to influence today is a failure. Like hitting your first t-shot of the day OB. <i>Sigh</i>

(How come 3 consecutive periods end up with a "?"??)

A simpler life is what we all seek from time to time. The grass is greener somewhat. But, didn't some famous songwriter from our era once say "You can't go back"? Enjoy it while you can, however temporary.

Alan -

Cynthia is right. Claiming a Christian basis for doing something wacko, undemocratic, unconstitutional, etc., is so tired. On the Amazing Race IV last night, the contestant who prayed to God to win lost - God has a sense of humour.

Wayne -

Rather then having a sense of humour, he is just way too busy! I guess it would be unnecessary but fair to point out the equally tired and stupid theory of killing for your God, as is so prevelent in Islam, is no different. Many Christians share and express the same belief that God does not care who wins the late game on Sunday. Few Muslims have the willingness to openly critize their "brothers" similarily for their twisted view on what they do is "God's will", and that includes the Muslim street, and the educated "elite". Being critical of Christianity is so trendy these days, I think it is getting as bad as lawyer jokes, of which even I have told a few.

Alan -

Are you at the beach? I can't keep up with the shifting sands. Read your own reply to see trendy - banal putting down of other cultures with generalities. And what's with the bold? This is a thread. [removed - ed.]

Alan -

I don't really know why this story is even news. If he had stolen 10,000 CDs off the back of a truck - or, heck, even 10 - he would have faced a criminal record.

Wayne -

No put down. Just observing how we seem to have a double standard when commenting about relegion. I am in Bathurst, miles from beach.

Alan -

Bad-urst? I hope the wind is blowing the other way. The pulp towns of northeast NB are quite a suomething. On the VIA train to Montreal the Bad-urst stop is just about suppertime. Take the later seating and you can smell your food.

Matthew -

[Al, please remove this post if my understanding of this thread and its rules are confused. Thankee.]

I'm curious Wayne where this statement comes from:

"Few Muslims have the willingness to openly critize their "brothers" similarily for their twisted view on what they do is "God's will", and that includes the Muslim street, and the educated "elite"."

Is this personal observation? (Of Muslims in the Maritimes?) Is there polling data to back up such an ambitious generalization?

And I'm still scratching my head over this non-sequitor:

"Many Christians share and express the same belief that God does not care who wins the late game on Sunday."

Many Christians share and express the belief that AIDS is a just war on homosexuals, many christians share and express the belief Peanut Butter+Chocolate=Tasty! many christians share and express the belief that Mel Gibson is now not only a bad actor, but is also getting old 'n ugly.

Almost 30% of the world's population is Christian--near the 2 billion mark. Out of 2 billion people you could find "many" Christians who believe in a flat world, but you'd likely find it nearly impossible to get "most" to agree with anything--you know, if you had the time to speak to all of them. Speaking of massive groups like this as having anything that approaches consensus is silly.

Wayne -

My comments are based on personal observations formed by conversations and close contact with members of many ethnic communities within the Maritimes.

The criticism of the Christian right and their appeal to God to take their side in such things as such things as little league baseball in previous comments led me to point out that most good Christians chuckle when they see such delusions of self-importance and significance.
A fried hard drive, busted radiator, bad golf and sore back tell me to say no more then I stand by my post.

Alan -

I also doubt a proper pollnig of our Islamic brothers ever took place but I do agree with the time having come to laugh at the right-wing fundamentalist Christians out there.

Matthew - spot on for use of the WW.

Matthew -

Man who Fallacy not as Cool as Masked man Fallacy

"My comments are based on personal observations formed by conversations and close contact with members of many ethnic communities within the Maritimes."

I was in the Martimes a few months ago, and almost every single major world religion and ethnic group was absent or severely unrepresented. I'd venture that the Muslims of the Maritimes may not be representative of, say, the Muslims of any where else in the world.

The people we talk to are representative of the people we talk to and nothing else.

--

Gotta love the British parliament. We'll wait until after the war to ask out the glaring, blinding question that occured to millions of people prior to the slaughter: Ah, what the @&^#% are we attacking Iraq for again?

I don't admire anyone willing to pretend they've been duped by Blair.

Ah, democracy. You still don't have any control, but you're allowed to complain.

[OK, the second part has nothing to do with the masked man fallacy. I just think it's cool to say. And sorry about the quoting, but what's a man to do? Give thanks for the drunken Guided by Voices fueled post? OK.]

Wayne -

"I was in the Martimes a few months ago, and almost every single major world religion and ethnic group was absent or severely unrepresented."...you really need to get out more. Where were you...Peggy's Cove? (Not that there is anything wrong with that)Many of the Muslim faith rightly place importance on their roots...unfortunately, that includes hatreds passed-on for for Jews and U.S. Government, no matter what govt is elected.

Talking to people is a great way to learn the content of their character, much of which is directly related to the society from which they come. I come in contact on a regular basis members of Synagogues, Mosques, and other faiths, right here in the Maritimes. And, many well educated but not smart individuals, unfortunately, carry their time honored hatreds, which they learned elsewhere...and therefore tell me about others from where they come.

Alan -

That is very funny. Having had, by profession, almost ten years of access to the most private sectrets and cloistered conversations of persons of all backgrounds, I am time and time again struck only by the foulmindedness of your average mainstream slightly right of centre hardly practicing Christian of european extract. If I heard one more PEI dork saying how he had been "jewed" I was going to scream. And, yes, I did ask them to watch their language.

Matthew -

Re: PEI dorks
Also: "What am I? Black?" and all the indian jokes
The Vancouver equivalent seems to be the oh-so-humorous asian with an accent impersonation.

--

So the US has appointed Iraq's ministers, or whatever they're calling their puppets, and they reflect the ethnic and religious make up of the country, just like the people who run the good 'ol USA! Har har. I guess whhen you don't have the elaborate systems of control and diversion that the US people labour under, you actually have to project at least the appearance of fairness.

Alan -

Yes, there are dorks everywhere with their own particular slanders to share...

Rob Paterson -

Hi wayne
I did mot know about your new home. Fun to find it.

Golf - the mystery man is no mystery here - Golf is obviously a passion. So if you are prepared to reveal the true Wayne - an open invite to our barn where golf is only minutes away

Alan -

Gotta love that Wayne, an invite.

[One thing I like about Wayne's World Rob, is that it is a separate conversation as, in fact, each thread can be. So far I have about 175 posts here. Each could be its own yappitry.]

Matthew -

With its opponents dying off a lot faster than they're being born, same sex marriage is inevitable. It's strange though--I don't know if I've ever seen a goverment trying to pass legislation that so many members clearly have personal problems with. Since even the Alliance is afraid of the notwithstanding clause, it seems the Supreme Court is in charge for the moment--though the Liberals have proven with their unending fumbling of the decriminalisation of marijuana (medicinal and otherwise) that the courts can only force them to make different rules, not better rules.

Wayne -

Thanks Rob for the invite...I am now right in the middle of a very vicious battle with my golf swing...I have lost alot of my ability resulting in a loss of confidence. And as golf is a game of confidence, the slide continues.

Golf is a passion that has been with me for 37 years, thru alot of changes, forks in the road, and deep, deep potholes, so I know, "this, too shall pass".

I hope to actually take you up on your offer someday, and perhaps that old Scot behind this thread might join us...and a good friend of mine might enjoy your comments on MBA programs and how to bring the University institution, and specifically, BBA depts, closer to the reality of the real business world.

Rob Paterson -

Talking about old Scots - here is my theory about golf. I have only played the game maybe 6 times I have never had a lesson. BUT after 4 miserable attempts when I became upset with how badly I was doing I let the old Scot through. No non Scottish blood has managed to sneak into my family for as long as we have kept records.

So here is my new theory. Stop trying to play yourself and let the ancestors play though. I try and drift off and let the old Scot take over. The more "I" let go, the better I hit the ball. I am no threat to any of you real golfers but I like to play now and maybe a few times in a round, I hit an amazing shot. But of course you who know the game probably know all of this long ago.

PS it would also be fun to talk about education

Wayne -

Trying too hard is a cardinal sin in golf...what you need to play this game and enjoy it is a bad memory...forget the last bad shot and think of the next good one. (Easier said then done)

I think you are on to something there, Rob. The sheep-stealers in my ancestory would agree, it is one good shot that keeps you coming back.

Wayne -

Al...interesting to hear you say over in <a href="http://www.reinvented.net" target="blank"><i>Reinvented</i></a>(emphesis mine) that are an export, (or import, depending on perspective)which is to say you are not from where you are. In other words, you are from somewhere else.

Hmmm........

Alan -

I am - Nova Scotia.

[P.S. - I linked you to the reinvented thread.]

Wayne -

I noticed something...are you encouraging the use of the word "from" in <a href="http://www.genx40.com/archives/2003/october/watchinggrannie#form" target="blank">your description</a> of where people originate by your own use of the word "from" in telling me about "Ben"? Therefore, you must acquit and excuse Islanders who likewise use the word in their documentation of those whose origins are not PEI...or refrain from future use of the word "from" entirely.

If you say Ben is "from PEI", are you not inferring/reiterating he is not "from" Ottawa when referring to him in the third person and needing to convey the important message of his origins?(which is to say he could be best described as "from" somewhere else when not sure the place he has left or is "from", and understand "somewhere else" can be shortened to "away"?)Otherwise, it would be only politically correct to refer to someones original home or location IF it is made public knowledge of their exact home or location. Hence, the benefit of National I.D. card.

Alan -

I do not have a problem with any reference to somebody being from where <i>they</i> say they are from. What is repugnant is when others say you are not from where you say you are from. I was born in Ontario of Scottish immigrants and raised in NS. Since undergrad I have lived in Ontario, PEI, Ontario and a bunch of towns in europe. I am from where I say I am - Nova Scotia. Ben in the past has defined himself as from PEI. The whole Islander crap is galling in its presumption of the ability to define others and its farcical but undoubtably present implicit superiority that exudes unxiously everytime the idea is put forward. The freedom to define yourself is also a constitutional principle - subjective experience.

Wayne -

Would you have more respect for implicit superiority or implicit inferiority?

I would deny either exists in stating one is an Islander, a Bluenoser, Newfie, or Caper. And, to prove me wrong, you would have to enter the mind of the speaker. To assume otherwise would be a denial of innocence until PROVEN guilty,

Alan -

You are right about Capers but it is different. There is no assumption that the nude emperor will be viewed as clothed. You miss the point. It is not what an Islander says of himself but what is said when another is deemed not an Islander. What would be nice would be an acceptance by these Islanders that they are no better and no worse and that there is a great big world out there - this would require dropping the "too insular to be xenophobic" nature of the culture though, the only thing that differentiates from other Maritimers. The needy thing about the culture is the desire to be different and better, neither of which are true in any fundamental way.

Wayne -

Perhaps this needy thing to which you refer has come from numerous, chance encounters with hauty mainlanders.(Do not read into this statement, neither you or I are hauty...not that there is necessarily anything wrong with being hauty)

But, I digress...I do not agree there is any inherent needy trends in Island culture. Well, maybe the odd large black, but...

Wayne -

...I have met several Islanders who have never been off the Island...a fact of which they openly and repeatedly boast.

Alan -

Only if idle.

Alan -

The comment that made his brain go click:<blockquote class="smalltext">Hey - you are and Islander that says rude things aobut PEI. You are my best witness or oath bolsterer on the Wayne thing. Between you and portland's ugly sister line I think we are on solid ground, very solid ground.</blockquote>Then, Wayne's bizarro response to Manners: <blockquote class="smalltext">You asked for thoughts on suggestions...<p>

Don't hide behind words like "Censorship" and "Free Speech", and use them to suit. Don't argue for the use of insulting comments(at least on other sites), then ask us to drop the rudeness here.<p>

Don't be cute with custom definations and justifications.(i.e."Twit"-it is rude no matter how you spin it)You are fooling nobody, and it is a bad reflection on what otherwise is a very entertaining site.<p>

Do apply the Golden Rule. Anything else, and you are sending a message you are looking for discourse, and you will get what you ask for.<p>

Do invite the Right. Most of the bloggers that comment are hopelessly lost to the left. I can't continue to be the only one right around here.</blockquote>And the response:<blockquote class="smalltext">Your self-certainty and chip is quite impressive. Disagreeing with you is not rudeness. Pointing out your blind spots is not rudeness. Not putting up with illogic is not rudeness. Being fed up with you is not either...<p>Let me just elaborate on what I consider your particular ill manners. Like SayNay, you think it is ok to go ballistic at any time and then call those who call you to task rude. I know you mean well but at least SayNay and Lisa apologized. You, however, think I have not come up to your standards at what is essentially my place. This is what I mean by self-certainly and chip. If you are that unhappy, just go away. If you think that you are not a participant in the problem of manners I raised and that it is proper to respond to a general call to better manners (which clearly included my own) by making such stunned accusations (and false ones at that) let me tell you it is not. I invite you to go elsewhere if you think that is an appropriate response. Go to wherever that lack of generosity is good manners, where ensuring above all you are right is taken for geniality. Go...be happy...but perhaps you better be elsewhere...and if you don't get some measure of reflection out of what I have written...go some distance.</blockquote>

Wayne -

<strike>Justice Alan McLeod presiding.</strike>
"A smile is the only curve that straightens everything out!"
Good luck tonight, catch up on our sleep later, eh?

Alan -

That is all I was asking for, not a lecture!

Lisa Howard -

A man's blog is his castle. I considered opening up a fight club over on my blog, but I don't really have the time. And I'm not so secretly quite happy to have my argument cut off like that.

In any case, I usually assume that the first one to throw out an ad hominem is the loser because it means he/she doesn't have a legitimate counter argument. So I actually feel slightly gleeful when the other side froths a little at the mouth. Ad hominems are lame in most real debates especially where important issues are at stake. I realise of course that a lot of other people (especially the right wing press) don't feel that way. You get the sense these days that if one side in a political debate called the other an 'expletive deleted,' roving packs of reporters would press the insultee with questions such as: "Is it true, sir, that you are an expletive deleted?"

On the other hand, where I come from rudeness especially swearing (especially women swearing) is de rigueur. My mother swears like a sailor. And as far as I can tell, it's pretty important to be able to use strong language when the situation calls for it. That's why I'm pro free speech.

Alan -

I have had a fight room like this one for Wayne and another for SayNay from time to time. My upbringing was definitely not sweary Mary but, for some reason, the Minister and his wife did not stop their children from bringing punk rock lps in the manse. I am for free speech but I do like a wee bit of refinement. Wayne takes a lot of crap from me as I cannot bear the "PEI is unique" (having lived there from 1997 to 2002) horsepucks but secretly I do not hold as strong a view on it as I enjoy making him blow a gasket over it. Putting him into the penalty box for a few days or hours does the trick. I was worried, however, that that newcomer who called himself Bible Thumper, when he as really an Aliant help desk worker yapping on the job, was taking liberties he had not earned. That was the real point of the manners speech.

Lisa Howard -

Oh. Can I use the words "daft cunt" then for expletives deleted?

Alan -

That...umm...would be bad. I would not like to release the hounds that I know Cyn has kept behind gates so well so far.

Lisa Howard -

OK. As I said, a man's blog is his castle.

Alan -

We (me and the staff) like euphamisms, however.

Wayne -

I admire those not afraid to voice an opinion when it is required or called for. Sometimes, there are consequences...many times thoughts shared are agreed upon by those left silent...sometimes the comments are just wrong. I admire a colleague of mine who had the courage to swim against the current lately in the local newspaper. His comments could be concerning a story that tells how tiny communities take care of their own, while larger centers would largely ignore. It could be about what some see as a local paper taking advantage of a known residents passing. It could have something to do with the strain in relations between the Codiac RCMP and the newspaper. In any event, a whole page in the local rag was devoted to the gentleman's passing. You be the judge on this interesting twist...<blockquote>
<i>"I had mixed emotions after reading the article "Lives Lived" in the </i>Times and Transcript<i> on Monday. I've policed the streets of Moncton for 16 years and personally arrested Eddie dozens of times. I'm now the D.A.R.E. (Drug Enforcement Resistance Education) co-ordinator for Codiac Detachment RCMP and have the task of teaching young children about the harmful effects of drug and alcohol abuse. The "Lives Lived" article failed to mention how Eddy rummaged through dumpsters to find food because he had spent all his money on booze, how he spent the majority of his adult life wandering the streets drunk. Eddy often slept outside, in hallways, dumpsters or in jail. He regularly defecated in his pants and wore the same clothes until the police or a friend, cleaned him up. I could go on, but I think you get the idea. It's a sad commentary on our society when gets half a page in your newspaper, when others who passed away get a couple of lines in the obituary. It's not my intention to degrade Eddy in any way, but it's also important we give an accurate picture of his struggles and not glorify his lifestyle to folk hero status."<p>
Cst. Derek Snow <br>
DARE co-ordinator<br>
Codiac Regional RCMP</blockquote></i>

Alan -

Derek Snow seems to think that neither the dead or those who remembered the dead knew their place. No one who pays any actual attention to the homeless in life is unaware they drink Lysol and shit their pants and get rolled by others whenever they get a little cash in hand. Their life is one of violence and degradation that takes place right in front of our eyes and stopping that life is not made a priority for anyone. From what I read, the dead man remembered was able to rise above the indignity of his circumstances to a certain degree even if he could never break free of it. He showed something dignified despite it all. When I was a kid in Kingston, Nova Scotia, Clem was the man like that. His family burned in their house as he stood outside one night. The fire department came to late. He went mad there and then. He refused to sleep in a house for the rest of his life and would not eat food until it was cold. I know that because the nice church ladies fed him in their homes when he knocked on the door. People made sure he had apples in his pockets. He walked the roads of central Annapolis Valley for years hunched looking at the space three feet ahead of himself. He stank, he was unpleasant to see. We were told to beware of other odd men as kids. We were never told that about Clem.<p>But I think I do get the idea. Someone like that had as hard a life as any in our society for reasons we and maybe he did not understand. By focusing on bad, by denegrating as he denies he is doing, Cst. Snow perhaps would ask us to remember that the DARE program does not take the human struggle into account. The badder the bad example the better. Two dimensional is easier.

SayNay? -

Did any of the six judges who served as Eddy's pallbearers, ever have him over for dinner?

Alan -

Maybe he had them over sometimes. Reminds me of a guy in Halifax who often came into my mother's shop. Really simple and probably 50. I am somewhat embarassed to not remember his name and it has been 20 years - I am thinking Kenny. He often carried a guitar or something else that he would leave wit the shop and pick up, say, three months later. People took the time to make sure he was paid attention to. Once the Archbishop of Canterbury spoke at an outdoor event and right in the middle of his speech, he comes the guy into the outdoor area, he walks up the aisle and on to the stage. The Archbishop never broke his speech but held his hand out which was taken. They held hands for maybe five minutes as the speech continued until the guy said see ya and walked away, the speech continuing behind him. Bet he was smelly. Bet no one gave a rat's ass.

Wayne -

<a href="http://www.genx40.com/archives/2004/october/octobersurprise1" target="blank">This story</a> was not the big play. The baserunning error by National League pitcher(the league that still thinks pitchers should hit and run) <a href="http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/baseball/mlb/players/5454/" target="blank">Jeff Suppan</a> was a bigger surprise and more damaging then Manny's throw. The thirdbase coach was yelling and waving, but Jeff had a moment of panic. Experience should have told him to block out everything but the coach, especially at that level of play.

Wayne -

Wayne has been very good.(Christmas is coming) Me...cheat? What did I do now? I haven't picked up a golf club in at least 3 weeks!

Alan -

Your purgatory is over. You can come back to the other threads.

Wayne -

Slow me...I just figgered out you were probably referring to ``that other Wayne```. I am almost ready to re-enter the general population, as they say in the slammer...(tongue-in-cheek I was never there). Do we have a keyboard for tongue-in-cheek yet?

Alan -

〈--)<p>:-τ<p>;-⊥

Wayne -

♪ ♪ It’s a Wonderful (Wayne’s) World! ♫ ♫

Unfortunately, some lawyer (I suspect a Democrat) at City Hall has denied my permit?.something to do with the City being uncomfortable with g-strings and a dunking pool, mixed with roman candles. The big plans have shifted. So, here I sit with my second (limit of three has been temporarily lifted) glass of a specially selected, very, very dry Italian (slightly under $40.00 - subtle yet robust, making a statement to the palate. Fitting, n’est pas?), with roast chicken, dumplings, sweet potato and cornbread all well into production. Choc/Raspberry Cheesecake for dessert. She is preparing all my favorites, and she does it so very well! And I just realized?I don’t own a red tie for the occasion. (My clan tartan just does not seem right) Might make a great gift for Christmas?or prize??? We will see.

My take on what we can learn from all this? In the spirit of the moment, I would like to offer these words of reconciliation to the blogger-nation made up of mostly those to the left...Kerry, Edwards, Daschle Gephardt, and their supporters are not losers. In the end, as in any election, only those who choose to vote against a candidate are real losers. The only losers here are the ones who voted against George Bush instead of for John Kerry. And, until the Democrats are seen to be able to weed out this protestor attitude base, and bring forward and replace them with positive and inspired thinkers, they will never win office in the U.S. of A. As does a cheater in golf, most times nobody really knows but the voter.

All this plays out well for Hillary, who would have missed her on her chance in 2008 with a Kerry victory. Who will oppose her?McCain, Rudi? Who know, but I think we will be in for another tough battle, with the first woman elected President as a distinct possibility.

First and bluntly put, Kerry’s wife was no First Lady. Two alphas in the same White House bed would be a disaster, especially if only one was elected. It might have been good for PEI, though. Everybody knows “Ketchup loves potatoes!” A big surprise for me was Bush’s win in North Carolina, Edward’s home state. Edward’s focus on swing states cost him at home, I guess. But, Kerry’s real mistake was he was not clear enough in his explanation of how he would carry out his plans. Talk about stronger, more popular, better economy, jobs, healthcare?but never any specifics of how to pay, how to persuade, what is this international “test” he referred to. This election could not be won being vague. He just did not connect. Bush’s plans were laid out, and he was the one that best showed the necessary quality of leadership, even if he did not shine in the debate format. I think better times in foreign policy are ahead for America in the next 4 years, for the simple reason that Bush has clearly demonstrated to the world that he will act on his <i>Principles</i>, which will make negotiations much easier in future?he will be bargaining from a position of demonstrated strength.

Lisa Howard -

Are you saying the left is negative?

No it isn't!

Wayne -

See, there you go! More negativity from the left..."No, it isn't!"
The Democrats that got all the attention were negative, fueled by the lies and distortion of Moore's desperate attempt to change public opinion, attempts to satisfy the need for attention by rock stars, Hollywood and Dixie chicks with cries to listen to THEM about how everything is done with smoke and mirrors...and how else to describe Kerry's platform? "This President did this", "This President did that", "This President...yadda yadda yadda!" What Kerry needed was to enforce how his plan differed and how it would work. He took what he thought was the easy road, saying "I must be better then Bush", rather then trying to say how he was going to do it better. The protestors and extreme left have hijacked the Party. They are Left, negative and got this campaign wrong. Wrong. Wrong. And to get it right, they have to believe in their candidate, not be motivated by who they dislike. Next time, tell Springsteen to stay home(s) or Winnebago or jet or Spa or...you get the message, right?

Alan -

Imagine. I think there is a point being made. On NPR this afternoon one pundit pointed out there are more left leaning Christians in the USA than right leaning ones but the left are not organized, do not see themselves having common cause that needs placing on the political agenda. I think this is quite right, that it has to be more than a rainbow coalition but a statement of moral righteousness that can (and would) dethrone the right-wing agenda. This may take decades but that is what the fundamentalists have done and it took them that long at least.

Wayne -

Must be the wine...I cannot blog or golf when having a drink.

Lisa Howard -

That was just a very small joke. I guess it was so small that it was more or less invisible to those of us here who are clearly on a mission.

Here's another joke: Attention joke here....

Yah! You tell em! The left is so negative. Remember the French resistance? What a bunch of whiners! The right it is so great! So positive and virile!

End of joke. Okay jokes are not my forte.

Actually, both sides are negative and that's because when you have an adversarial system each side has to say not only what they think should happen, but also what they think shouldn't (Abu Ghraib anyone?!!). I know. I'm a dullard. But this "let's not be negative" thing itself strikes me as a hypocritical and negative attempt to stage manage debate. Dissent is actually a really important and positive political force. It's also a two sided one in which the positive side is highlighted by what we say we don't want. That's as true of the left as it is of the right. Pro life is anti abortion. Pro 'traditional' nuclear family is anti gay marriage. And really, the anti anti is itself a criticism and in my opinion it's one that stifles debate.

Wayne -

[I got your joke. I bet you are the life of the party. I understand well tongue in cheek. I have been shown how it can be used against you when you think it should be understood and comical. Maybe we do agree. Many are going to extreme exaggeration of the other side to portray theirs in a better light. We all may be guilty. Maybe you agree with this.]

"Listen to me about politics and economics because I am closer to God!"

"Listen to me about politics and economics because I make a living making believe I am someone else, can sing notes better then you, can make you laugh, paint.!"

Both stances are quite similar in many ways. Both have Icons called Madonna. Both are extremely convicted to their cause. Both sides are irritating. The difference is it is politically correct right now to condemn religion, (especially Christianity) while worshipping those whose talents include hitting a curve ball or making us laugh by farting with a smile(witness all the claims out there by Democrats that this was a fundamental religion victory). Where years ago, faithful flocked to church to be led with fire and brimstone, now it is to M&M concerts with his hateful ranting about Jews and other faiths, Michael Moore films that craftily present perspectives that are mixed with misrepresentations, or some other pop-tart of the day, preaching social justice, then retiring to their luxurious homes, 6 car garages, private jet and home spa.

Perhaps the election of George Bush has signaled that the Moore extreme left is not able to achieve their agenda and it may be better for the Democratic Party to distance themselves from them. Maybe we should thank Moore for Bush’s election. The Republicans do a better job, I think, in managing their fringes. They keep getting elected. To me, it seems that the Democratic Party leadership is a contrast to its extreme left views. But, the leaders seem to try to take advantage of them, hoping to ride them to victory. This is why I see the position of leader so important. They must properly represent their supporters, and their supporters must support them, not be voting against someone else. It does not seem to be working for the Dems. The US does need a third, and maybe forth party to give these extremes a home they can call their own, while those with common sense and those fed up with these outer fringes can get on with running the country in a responsible, decent manner. It has, to some extent, worked in Canada. But, we are not the leaders of the free world.

Alan -

Watch out! Wayne was on the wine last night!

PS: its eminem. M+M is a small candy, chocolate or peanut in a hard candy shell.

Wayne -

LOL
P.S.And the difference between the two is???

Wayne -

<a href="http://www.drudgereport.com/" target="blank">"Federal authorities arrested hundreds and conducted thousands of interviews in the months leading up to the election, all aimed at foiling a feared terrorist attack that could disrupt balloting... Developing..."</a>
Thank God for the Patriot Act!

Wayne -

A sneak look at <a href="http://msnbc.msn.com/id/3032542/" target="blank">Newsweek's</a>
upcoming story that documents the negativity of Kerry in particular, and his campaign in general, can be found <a href="http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/6414892/site/newsweek/" target="blank">here!</a>

Wayne -

Take my Test!
Consider the one that best applies to you (accurate to within 3 percentage points on occasion)

1) I more strongly disagree with allowing Pope John Paul III and other religious leaders telling me how to live my life, and what is truth. (1 point)

2) I more strongly disagree with allowing Michael Moore and other scatter-brained celebrities telling me how to live my life, and what is truth. (2 Points)

- If you are not from Florida and/or are only able to add up to 1, you probably are Democrat.
- If you are from Ohio, and/or need 11 days to add up to 2, you probably are Republican.

This is what is wrong, and this is what needs to be fixed!

Wayne -

[ Note: A new feature here.]

Are you being heard?

Wayne – 33
Alan_- 31
Lisa Howard - 5
Matthew - 4
Humblebub - 2
Rob Paterson - 2
Brad Pineau - 1
SayNay – 1
Dan James - 1

Wayne -

<a href="http://www.michaelmoore.com/" target="blank">This fool</a> just does not know when he is beat. What does the Democratic Party (the left)need to regain long-lost past glory and success? Democrat outrage at Democratic Extremists and their subsequent Democratic Extremist stupidity.

Wayne -

It would add to the warm, fuzzy feeling around here if you removed the above reference to probation. After all, you did indicate I had paid back the blog for crimes for which I was convicted.<p>[<i>Ed: appracoh the pardon board on this one, ex-con.</i>]

Wayne -

Would they expect me to admit guilt? I could have problems going there. (:^ô)

Alan -

Personal reponsibility for one's own actions is not the strong hand for the right, that is correct. Requiring obligation from others is more that style.

Wayne -

I have been told to consider the <i>Ontario Court of Appeal</i>. Your server is on P.E.I. right? Note: (;^Ô)

Any chance Wayne’s World can get a RSS feed?

Alan -

That would be encouraging you.

Wayne -

I just heard on the CBC News a woman recently found innocent of assisting in a terminally ill patient commit suicide describe assisted suicide as “an extension of healthcare”.

Huh?

Alan -

Go ask some doctors about helping people on the way out. Happens every hour of every day - everywhere. If the wrong Crown gets involved, it is a crime. Otherwise it is a day to day reality. Called plug pulling. Get with the program.

Wayne -

But, my point was, sir, is it right to label it "healthcare"?

Alan -

Exiting the mortal coil is part of life. Heard an excellent interview 20 years ago with Morley Callaghan and the then Moderator of the United Church who had been a doctor in China with Norman Bethune. It was on Morningside. Both old men agreed that there was too much prissiness these days about the common job doctors always played in helping people out the door by way of the big needle. The Moderator spoke up and said he and Bethune had done it routinely during the Coomunist Revolution in China for young soldiers who were too backly wounded to save. What are you going to do, he said, spend hour watching them die in incredible suffering or let them float out on morphine?

Wayne -

Mentioning "slippery slope" will get us nowhere in this discussion. A different approach to this would be, if this (your China story) was the strategy throughout medical practice, there would be no need to push for medical breakthroughs in treating what has been fatal illness'...rather, just give 'em the needle, and save the research funding for improving cosmetic surgeries and growing hair(Not that I need to grow any more hair).

Calling it "Healthcare" is a ploy to induce federally funding. An attempt to legitimize it in Canada. I hope Shania Twain gets up on the soapbox on this issue, because 1) She looks good on a soapbox-and I usually turn down the volume when watching CMT anyway 2)Celebrity/actor/actress/singer/lip-sync preaching will be the kiss of death for this movement with social conservativism in Canada. Maybe Liberals could take this issue and support one that actually represents a majority view for once...just say No to condoning suicide for ill patients. Because, the only one that knows an illness is fatal is God. (Gee, that tough bugger Arafat fooled them all!)

Alan -

The medical industry loves folks like you. Traditionally, this shuffling off stuff would be a matter taken care of by the family and a local practitioner. But industrial needs to sell drugs for stockholder's profit has taught us that death can be defeated. Just another example of the family being removed from the equation by elite professionals and business interests of the right. Sad and dehumanizing. God made us mortal so I don't think he would be necessarily pleased with intervention that makes the exit out long, drawn-out, painful and lonely.

Alan -

Testing to see if the RSS works...

Alan -

I cannot make a separate RSS for the comments on one thread. I am checking making the single link space for this thread with comments updating.

Wayne -

Nobody said anything about painful and lonely.
Mini, but mighty!
Looks good.

Alan -

I meant it is a link but nope in terms of separate "RSS" and an "updated reply" function. I have asked the gods that be.

Wayne -

Can we (you) archive? My popularity might require high-speed to load the thousands of comments I am expecting. And about that intro we privately discussed earlier...?

Alan -

All this is is a thread link. They are archived in the sense that you have your own thread and the comments build up like they do on any thread. The intro is the original thread. If you want another thread, one can be assigned and that will appear as well at the Wayne's World category page but you do not get the power to start threads on your own. I am checking into how many bells and whistles can be added to a thread.

Wayne -

Just curious about the number of comments getting outa hand...I am tongue-in-cheeking here really. Whatever...it is great. Except for the Disclaimer. If you want a disclaimer, come to think of it, I am ok with that...you being a lawyer 'en all. But, Much Later has come and gone, as far as I am concerned.

Wayne -

But God gave us the brains to help ourselves in times of trouble, right? Using pennicillen is not against Gods Will. He says nothing about pennicillen in the Old Testament.

Wayne -

Thinking of <a href="http://www.dunvegan-hotel.com/" target="blank">this place</a> brings a tear to my eye, I miss it so. When I feel I am up to it, I will share my experiences there with all.

Wayne -

<b>The</b> American Constitution is 5 pages long. The European version is 300. E.U. spokesman claim “It is called a Constitution, but it is not a Constitution. It is a Constitutional Treaty.”
Huh?

It started with trade treaties and has evolved to now include foreign policy. France sees the E.U. as a way to regain lost world influence. Great Britain sees it as a threat to independence. It, quite possibly, could be an emerging balance to the economic giant to our south. Will it eventually become the “United states of Europe”?

Wayne -

[Moved from here]<p>"Sweet" does not always equate with soccer fan behaviour, although one could hardly fault the jersey. <p>And that Democracy referred to may soon be introduced to the need for militant protection from a different threat, based on the simmering and radical behaviour one reads about lately in the news that is occuring there.

Wayne -

By setting example and influencing policies, leaders lead. Negative leadership begats negative policy. Streisand, Moore, Mellencamp, Dreifuss, etc. through their attempts to act as leaders,(instead of entertainers)have failed. Miserably. Their influence and views on policy will require strong leadership to erase. Policy without leadership is like being lost in a maze. Where do we turn? Why is the Left so afraid of strong leadership? Is it the collective mentality? Insecurity?
How will the Left bring itself back from the depths of their depression and on to the White House? The debate rages on! Let me simplify the matter. The United States is a conservative country. All the Democrats need to do is to elect a leader that looks like and acts like a Republican leader. Then, simply adapt the Republican policies as their own, and there, you have it. ("And, if it walks like...")

Wayne -

We have a friend staying with us for awhile who calls West Africa home. I spend a very enjoyable evening last night listening to her comments about the situation in that region lately, especially the events occurring now in the Ivory Coast. Her cousin is in the U.S. Marines and stationed in Iraq. As this is Ramadan, (and both are Muslim) he is posted away from the battle zone raging near Falluga. She talks to him on occasion, and although he cannot reveal where he is, he has assured her he will be safe for the next few weeks.

As you may know, Muslims are forbidden to eat pork or drink alcohol. They pray 5 times a day, facing the east towards Mecca. During Ramadan, they fast during daylight hours as an expression of their devotion and sacrifice. While being a devout Muslim, she has also held on to the traditional tribal beliefs of her region, which sound to me somewhat similar to those held by ancient First Nations here in North America, involving the spirit world in nature.

As someone who does not attend Service as regularly as I should, I find it refreshing to see the discipline and conviction to her religious belief. It is not her first time to see snow, but she still shudders and visibly shivers when she sees it. And, this morning, we had our first significant snowfall. Interestingly enough, French is her first language. But, in her native tongue, the word “snow” does not exist, as far as she knows.

Wayne -

“Doing the right thing is easy; it’s knowing what the right thing is which is the difficult part” (former US President, Lyndon B Johnson). Words of a man torn by the dilemma he inherited, and the pressure he faced in making the right decisions. Long ago, my Dad gave me advice on debt. As I was yet to attend University and still quite young, it was a real “heads up” for me on one of the ways of the world. Even after some graduate work, it seemed to stick with me with more influence then most theories and logic I had encountered during the time I spend in study. Dad explained to me that debt was not inherently wrong. He explained there were two kinds of debt - good and bad. He saw good debt as that which offered a return on investment, like a house, (markets then were more predictable) an education or opening a business. Things like cars and televisions (B&W) were doomed to depreciation, and were a poor choice for which to enter into debt. I have been fortunate to have the opportunity to pass on what I consider good advice to someone else, and I hope it finds as much value in their life (But he is probably still gonna buy the plasma).

There has been some discussion about values and morals in the media, and some also in the exercise and entertainment found in the typing done in blogs. And it has had me pondering what defines “good” values and the decision-making process it encumbers. In my case, I find my source of guidance mainly through what was important to, and shown to me, by example and words encountered in my family and circle of friends. There are times when “doing the right thing” is easy. Laws of the land, snow tires and playing by the rules of the game. However, such is not always the case when consequences influence others, and a weighing of the outcome is required. In such cases, I find I weigh what my father might have said or done or suggested as a guide. Certainly when I consider he was a product of a different time, the formula is complicated significantly. But, there always seems to be a hint of light that guides me in a certain direction.

Applying this to a bigger picture, cultural influences from our varied communities can influence decision making, but in this time of a shrinking world, overlapping of these cultures can blur what may have one time seemed clear. Lately, I feel things are not seen with a similar perspective across not only cultures, but generations as well. Perhaps it is due to the fact that newer generations have been taught to place less importance on history and the past, and to think for themselves - “outside the box”. In that case, it is understandable that what was will not always be, certainly applying in the area of “values”, which is not necessarily a bad thing. But it is still, no doubt, unsettling. And, sometimes, there just isn’t a right answer. At times when uncertainty is troubling, I am able to find guidance and confidence in my decisions when I base them on that which I consider significant to me. And to have the opportunity to offer that thought process to another in a way which I see as a positive influence, is a privilege. How it is received is another matter entirely.

How many other ways are there to define/create the influence called “values”? Is there a wrong way to do so? Is it unrealistic to expect that any two can share exact common values, based on how values are defined in so many ways?

Alan -

My prof. the Canadian conservative Philosopher George Grant railed against "values" to the point that "moral values" now always strikes me as a contradiction, an oxymoron. A morality is what your father espoused, a truch in relation to something that never shifts. Value is contextual and alwasys differs for different people by its very definition - it is subjective on the vlaue the person gives it. Many people who believe they are being moral are only stressing the values that work for them - many Christian congregations of all sorts fall into this problem, for example, by stressing one part of the Bible over others. Fundamentalists tend away from the Gospels infavour of the old Testament. High Anglicans love St. Paul. Hard for me to find fault with the United Church's stress on the gosepls over other areas but that is still selective. The Bible, no doubt in common with other religious texts, warns against this selective use and the placing of the readers values over the entire, difficult statement of the Truth.<p>We all slip into the seduction of the easy and banal. You often repeat the "young people today" line which I have never gotten as I know there were as many if not more bastards in the 1970s when I was a kid and even more in the 1940s when my folks were. For me that is an example of a value for you. A principle you live by without considering its validity. It is certainly not a moral principle as it is only contextual and personal to you. I will let you point out my corresponding failing which I no doubt display regularly.

Wayne -

Although it is almost impossible to tell a life story in 2 hours, especially the story of someone as interesting as Muhammed Ali or Ray Charles, I would recommend everyone see the movie "Ray", if for nothing more then to enjoy Jamie Foxx's portrayal. It is a revealing story about a troubled man with immense talent, and how he encounters and finally faces down his demons. Nothing is hidden, from his carousing with numerous women, (including tips on how women love a man to touch their wrists...it works!) to drugs and alcohol abuse. His admirable morals in dealing in business, or a culture still gripped in segration are equally treated as are his shortcomings and all is left for the viewer to judge whether or not he was a "good man", as well as a gifted musician. I had hoped to see his rendition of "America the Beautiful" at Ron Reagans Presidental Inaguration, but, the movie makers ran out of time.

In response to your response, I confess to being full of failings, (based on my values). I realise I am not a trained writer, nor feel the necessity or desire to become so,...engaging most of the time in nothing more then an exercise in typing, as I mentioned earlier. I really don't worry about it, like I do my backswing value failings, or those in finding a datatype mismatch solution. While I do not enjoyably ponder the failings of others, I must confess in resorting to such immoral behaviour. I think it may have something to do with playing "defense", based on values. Not a mature behaviour, really. But, I guess sometimes one needs to have things pointed out to them, non? Certainly, I do, from time to time.

However, The "young people today" preamble could be, or appear to be, onesided and misrepresent a value, due to the fact I have failed to balance my written perspective with accounts of the good deeds and intentions I recognize in that generation, but have failed to emphesize. A suspect a good writer would not fail to do so, and that I am not alone in this. I may try harder to show the balanced views I hold, but neglect to express. Keep in mind that said preamble could reveal a deep-down concern over youth's future path, but has failed to have been articulated in a way to be properly understood. It is complicated.

Sidebar...A treat for enduring such unskilled rambling. High Anglicans in Ch'town love St. Peter. I am a member of this congregation! My Grandfather was head newscaster at CFCY during the war years, and a member of St Peter's (Cathedral...under the aspices of the Bishop of Nova Scotia...a topic for another time, perhaps). During a news broadcast, he described the sinking of an Allied ship as being "scuttled". I was told it is a word of German origin, and my Grandfather was brought under suspicion due to a complaint laid by the Priest of the day at "rival" St Paul's. (This speaks to the world as it existed then) The police did a mild investigation and found no wrongdoing. My family held a distain for that Parish of St Paul's ever since. I had found out this and other stories about him when doing a research paper during studies at UPEI.

Alan -

Any idea why the RSS for this thread has gotten 481 visits in January alone? Who all out there has this on their aggregators?

Wayne -

I still have it in my bookmark for Blogs that loads in tabs. Certainly my visits alone would not account for such popularity (or distain and disgust). I have an aggregator, but do not use it, and don't have never tried to point it here, so it ain't me.

Alan -

Two words - "fan base".